The molten core of agile

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Having spent the second half of my software engineering career doing ‘agile’ development, I think I’ve spent more time trying to convince people what agile is not than explaining to the uninitiated what it isSince the so-called manifesto was published in 2001, the whole thing’s been so abused, monetized and co-opted that, for all intents and purposes, it seems to have lost any tangible meaning. By 2014, I had basically decided I would simply use the word ‘lean’, since the culture around agile was so polluted with nonsense…

What made this thing so popular in the first place? I remember reading about it and feeling like it was a bit revolutionary… I was excited by it. Excited because, in many ways, it was a repudiation of decades of stodgy and bureaucratic software practices that I always despised. My blog is called ‘On the Contrary’, after all, so I naturally found this upending of the table appealing.

If I peel back the layers and get at the hot molten core of agile, though, what is it really? What was its intent?

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Build culture not process

When launching a new business or a new initiative, I see lots of teams make the mistake of obsessing over what process they are going to use to manage the software production efforts.

They start, typically, with some ‘textbook’ example of SCRUM©… this quickly leads to obsessive debate over what ticketing tools to use… which then devolves into silly discussions over what ‘states’ the ticketing process should have (‘waiting for tests’, ‘testing in progress’, ‘testing failed’, etc)… Add in some arguments about what roles would be on the team and the delicate parsing of the responsibilities that do, and do not, belong to each… it doesn’t take long before I’m wondering: ‘When did we stop being software engineers and become process engineers?’

The problem is that we’ve forgotten the FIRST principle of the agile software movement:

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Oh yeah… forgot about that.

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